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What Israeli schoolchildren sing to deal with rockets


Jewish Standard News interview summary of the local teacher who composed the song in the Israeli school children's video



"This song was composed by a local teacher and has been taught to hundreds of schoolchildren within firing range of Gaza's rockets to help them deal with the fear and trauma of having 15 seconds to run for cover when the Color Red siren sounds.

Shachar Bar, an art therapist who teaches in Sderot, became increasingly alarmed after seeing the thousands of children of the western Negev suffering the ...cumulative effects of trauma due to the ongoing barrage of Kassam rockets from Gazan Palestinians. Teachers reported the fear and panic being heightened each time the recorded alert “Color Red” sounded, giving students 15 second to run for cover.

“Children experienced real developmental regressions, some began bedwetting,” she said. “They were getting hysterical when the alarm sounded – some freezing in place, unable to seek cover. One day I felt like ‘now is the time’ and I took this song I'd made up to a kindergarten class.”

The song begins with the children mimicking the alarm system, chanting “tzeva adom, tzeva adom,” Hebrew for Color Red. (The original alarm was “shachar adom” (red dawn), but children named Shachar were reportedly being affected socially and the municipality changed it.)

“[By mimicking the alert system] we touch slightly upon this threatening thing in a playful way, while in a safe, protected place with people we trust,” she explains. “That is the introduction.”

The song continues, with children seeking cover as they sing:

Hurry, hurry, hurry, to a protected area Hurry, Hurry because now it’s a bit dangerous

“Running to our safe areas or ducking under the table, depending on where we are, coincides with the song,” Bar explains. “There is a fact: it is dangerous outside and we must seek shelter.”

My heart is pounding, boom, ba-ba, boom, boom, boom My body is shaking, doom, da-da doom, doom, doom

“I am giving validation and legitimization to my fear and my body’s reactions,” Bar explains. “It is OK that my heart is pounding, I am even singing about it. It is OK that my body is trembling – I am afraid. Along with the words ‘boom-boom’ and ‘doom-doom,’ the movements of arms crossed and pounding on our chest borrowing from the EMDR method of treating trauma and anxieties. The movements help to break out of it and dissolve the anxiety, improving the mood.”

But I am overcoming Because I am a little bit different …The impact…boom – now we can get up

“Again, we remain in the reality,” Bar says. “We hear the impact and we can get back on our feet and begin with the release.”

Our body we shake, shake shake Our legs we loosen, loosen, loosen Breathe deep, blow far Breathe deep, now we can laugh

“We breathe deep and release - a yoga method, even a yoga laughter method when we release the laughter,” Bar says. “Laughter releases endorphins into our brain and into our entire system.”

The song concludes: It all passed and I’m glad it's over – Yes!!

Bar says the song has spread throughout Sderot and the area kibbutz and moshav schools as well. “The joy that the children display there with the release…Once they learned it they were asking to do it again and again. Suddenly they had a tool to deal with all this, that they could hold on to.”

Link to the story behind the amazing Sderot teacher
whose song helps schoolchildren deal with rockets.



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